Technology

No longer hype: green hydrogen is real

Today’s fanfare surrounding green hydrogen isn’t the first time we’ve seen excitement about this gas: a Google search will show that the phrase “hydrogen economy” peaked in 1976, only to fade away by 1995. Then in 2006, Ford, BMW and Mazda were bringing hydrogen cars to market (remember those?), and hype shot up once again, only to fade away.

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Community

Understanding our Past Is Key to Building the Future We Want

As our country transitions to cleaner sources of energy and income on native lands and across the U.S. (which – technically – is all Native land), we need to ensure benefits of renewable projects uplift the native communities they’re sited in.

— Nov 17, 2022

Impact

There Are No Red Counties or Blue Counties, Only Solar Counties

In this political climate, virtually any issue can seem either red or blue — not least in energy. Investments in renewable energy like solar are regularly treated by media outlets, political pundits and politicians as a solely Democratic priority.

— Mar 16, 2022

Technology

No longer hype: green hydrogen is real (Part 2)

Of all the various applications of green hydrogen, its role in expanding the capabilities of energy storage is perhaps the most critical to decarbonizing our electric grid. Especially as we push forward toward a 100% renewable energy grid, emerging technologies like green hydrogen will significantly expand the amount of intermittent renewable energy we can store.

— Feb 14, 2022

Technology

No longer hype: green hydrogen is real

Today’s fanfare surrounding green hydrogen isn’t the first time we’ve seen excitement about this gas: a Google search will show that the phrase “hydrogen economy” peaked in 1976, only to fade away by 1995. Then in 2006, Ford, BMW and Mazda were bringing hydrogen cars to market (remember those?), and hype shot up once again, only to fade away.

— Feb 2, 2022

Impact

It’s win-win. Remote work provides opportunities for an often-ignored talent pool: military spouses.

As we know, the COVID-19 pandemic has thrust us into a very necessary but delicate grand experiment where millions of workers became suddenly remote. And you know what? It can work, and it works incredibly well for a specific demographic I have the honor of being a part of: military spouses.

— Nov 11, 2021

Community

A New Energy on Tribal Lands

Native communities and lands have historically borne some of the worst impacts of fossil fuel development through the health damages associated with coal fired power plants, the destruction of fragile ecosystems and sacred sites, and of course, the impacts of climate change. When Indigenous peoples have a seat at the table to determine the highest use of their land – it is both for the betterment of their communities and the environment. Historically, this has not always been the case.

— May 19, 2021

Technology

Fact Check: Is Solar Really Cheaper than Gas?

At a major conference for energy dealmakers and finance players last year, I found myself chatting with a utility executive from Alabama who was looking at contracting a new gas plant. Genuinely curious, I asked him if he’d ever considered solar. He responded with the familiar refrains: that solar is too expensive and unreliable – and that he wasn’t willing to gamble on an alternative energy.

— Oct 28, 2020

Impact

How Women Will Shape Our Energy Future

When women are encouraged in STEM careers, the possibilities are endless. Read why we should approach increasing diversity in STEM with the same tenacity as our pursuit of a clean energy future.

— Oct 22, 2020

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